LIS-GISIG: Gov Info, Sources, Data & Docs

• Government Information Student Interest Group •
Graduate Schools of Library & Information Studies .
Because EVERY Librarian is a Gov Info/Doc Librarian! . ............................................................................ . #tumblarian in the house (and in the Senate)
Recent Tweets @gov_infoSIG
Posts We Like
Following

Anyone up for a librarian contingent at this Sunday’s NYC/U.N. People’s Climate March?

For related gov info, search for “climate" or "environment" on gov-info.tumblr.com

Sept. 17 is Constitution Day

Besides well-known European precedents — from Greece, Rome, and English common law, among others — Indigenous American ideas of democracy have profoundly shaped the government of the United States. Immigrants arrived in colonial America seeking freedom and found it in the confederacies of the Iroquois and other Native nations. By the time of the Constitutional Convention in 1787, these ideas were common currency in the former colonies, illustrated in debates involving Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, and John Adams.*

Two hundred years after the Constitutional Convention, the U.S. Congress acknowledged this formally in H.Con.Res. 331.

Senator Daniel Inouye (D-Hawaii) introduced S.Con.Res. 76 on Sept. 16, 1987, and The Senate Committee on Indian Affairs held Hearings Dec. 2 1987. Representative Morris Udall (D-Arizona) introduced similar legislation in the House of Representatives as H.Con.Res. 331. The House agreed to H.Con.Res. 331 on Oct. 4, 1988 by a vote of 408-8, and the Senate agreed to H.Con.Res. 331 by voice vote on Oct. 21, 1988.

*U.S. Embassy Gov Doc: Native American Ideas of Governance and U.S. Constitution (Johansen & Grinde Jr)

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) released a new guide to help the federal government educate its employees on how to protect their rights to be free from employment discrimination.

This document provides a compilation of practices and ideas for how federal agencies should inform their employees about equal employment opportunities and rights in an electronic age.


As a part of the SEP the Commission has adopted the following national priorities:

  • eliminating barriers in recruiting and hiring
  • protecting immigrant, migrant, and other vulnerable workers
  • addressing emerging and developing issues
  • enforcing Equal Pay Laws
  • preserving access to the legal system
  • preventing harassment through systemic enforcement and targeted outreach

HT alan zoellner

September 17 is Constitution Day

usnatarchivesexhibits:

Constitution of the United States

Item From: General Records of the United States Government. (05/14/1787- 09/17/1787)

The Federal Convention convened on May 14, 1787 in Philadelphia’s Independence Hall to revise the problematic Articles of Confederation. Since only two states had delegations present, any substantive debate was postponed until a quorum of seven states was attained on May 25th. After exhaustive deliberation well into the middle of June, the Convention concluded that the Articles were not salvageable and needed to be replaced with something that represented their collective interests while ensuring their continued independence.

Through subsequent closed sessions, the delegates continually debated, drafted and redrafted the articles of this new Constitution until it resembled the one we have today. The main points of contention were how much power was apportioned to the Federal Government, how many Congressional representatives were allotted to each state, and whether these representatives would be directly elected by their constituents or appointed by their state legislatures.

This new Constitution was the cumulative result of many minds coming together to conceptualize and debate the future course of the country. Through subsequent generations it has been amended and reinterpreted many times, but its continued success stems from adherence to these early promises of representation and compromise.

Source: http://go.usa.gov/DQ6Y

(via ourpresidents)

Gov Docs for Sexual Assault and Prevention: Resources for information, statistics, assistance, education, programs, grants and action

24/7 Hotlines

HHS

CDC

Department of Justice

Government in Action on Violence Against Women

Other

note: In light of recent events, and the 40th anniversary of the Violence Against Women act,  we’re reposting Sexual Assault resources, as the news  rarely mentions the prevalence of partner violence nor how to seek help. Perhaps we can use the opportunity to bring the conversation, and this information, to our communities.

September 17 is Constitution Day! The Mother of Gov Docs!

GPO & LOC Gov App: Annotated Constitution

The U.S. Constitution: Analysis and Interpretation app is a mobile version of the “Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation,This app:

- Delivers the full text of “Constitution of the United States of America: Analysis and Interpretation”
- Contains a clause-by-clause discussion of the entire Constitution
- Discusses all Supreme Court cases and selected historical documents relevant to interpreting the Constitution
- Lists all federal, state, and local laws struck down by the Supreme Court, and all cases where the Court overturned its prior precedent
- Contains a table of contents, table of cases, and an index

You may perform keyword searches within individual documents or sections within documents; share documents via email; or save them to your preferred PDF reader.

USDA Gov App: The Dried Botanicals Key to ID Your Potpourri

U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service Dried Botanicals Key appwas designed for professional botanists and plant-enthusiasts alike to quickly identify the variety of dried (scented, bleached or color-dyed) fungi, fruits, seeds and leaves you’re likely to find at your local craft shops and gift stores. Because these mixes can include poisonous, toxic, and invasive plant material capable of carrying plant diseases, it’s “key” that you know what you are using.

The app features close-up, full-color photos for each entry with descriptive language both scientists and amateurs will find helpful on-the-go.

For instance, select “Flowers buds” under the Flowers drop-down menu and “Radial” shape under the Symmetry menu, swipe to the left, and you’ll learn more about the finer aspects of eucalyptus buds than you ever dreamed.

NASA Gov Doc: Hubble’s Smash Hits

A collection of Hubble Space Telescope’s most iconic images.

We saw the windycitylibrarian’s question about classroom accommodations, and decided to answer it publicly, as creating “accessible environment” is not just the right thing to do, it’s the law. [A Gov Doc. ]

In a nutshell: There’s a Gov program devoted to all aspects of disability information and resources: disability.gov (creative name)

The site has both an “education” section [sample resource] and a technology” section [sample resource.] (reach by top toolbar.)

Most of the guides do not require “official” 508 status, but as you said, the student should register with disability services to guarantee a full range of accommodations* (more below). The site has excellent instructions about how to obtain it. 

Also, I thought the Veterans Administration might be a good resources,as (sadly) many vets have disabilities like your student’s. [va education page] Currently, I don’t see much information geared to this specific disability accommodation; but I have sent a email to the VA requesting it.

As to institutional avenues:

Cathy asked, are you at a school? All schools with federal funding must accommodate students/staff, if not have a formal Office of disability services. If not, or they’re not helpful, disability.gov links to state and local resources.

If a disability is a result of military action (even if not in combat), go to the va for benefits. The recent Obama initiative has increased funding and support for vet’s education (and jobs).

Hope this is helpful. We’ll post more information upon request.

*it will also help raise awareness & and increase services and funding.

cathylibrary:

windycitylibrarian:

Hey all,

I have a student who does not have use of the right hand, which makes computing particularly difficult. I guess I can switch the mouse around, but I have other students who use the lab and I don’t know if I’ll be able to consistently switch the controls over…

Does this student have an IEP or 504 on file? Check there, because there may already be accommodations in place.

If changing the mouse is too much, can the student use a laptop with a trackpad?

Is assigned seating an option, so if you do have to set up a computer, can you always set up the same one?

We have a study room set up with adaptive technology-most of it is software, but I can see what we have for hardware on Monday.

hispanicheritagemonth.gov: September 15-October 15 is National Hispanic Heritage Month

Each year, Americans observe National Hispanic Heritage Month from September 15 to October 15, by celebrating the histories, cultures and contributions of American citizens whose ancestors came from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America.

So, why September 15-October 15?

It seems a bit strange that in contrast to all the other “heritage” celebrations and recognitions, the one for Hispanic Americans starts in the middle of the month – September 15 to be exact. That selection, however, has profound roots in Hispanic history.

The day of September 15 is significant because it is the anniversary of independence for Latin American countries Costa Rica, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras and Nicaragua. In addition, Mexico and Chile celebrate their independence days on September 16 and September18, respectively. Also, Columbus Day or Día de la Raza, which is October 12, falls within this 30 day period. more from LOC

UN Docs: This is What Google Suggests When you Type “Gays”

We were so moved by the UN Women's powerful new ad campaign that we made our own. Thanks to the UN Women team and Queerty for the inspiration!

Free & Equal is a United Nations campaign for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender equality.


Maria A. Pallante has released a public draft of the Compendium of U.S.
Copyright Office Practices, Third Edition (the Third Edition). The first
major revision in more than two decades, the draft presents more than 1200 pages of administrative practices and sets the stage for a number of long-term improvements in registration and recordation policy. It will
remain in draft form for 120 days pending final review and implementation,  taking effect on or around December 15, 2014. (So if you’re concerned about Copyright, you have plenty of time to read & comment. NOTE: There’s a good toc, so you can find easily your sections of interest/expertise.) more

Other Copyright Resources:

HT: David Dillard

September 6-13 is Suicide Prevention Week
24-hour Suicide hotline: 1-800-273-TALK
SAMSHA & MIMH Gov App: Suicide Lifeguard
Suicide Lifeguard is a FREE app intended for anyone concerned that someone they know may be thinking of suicide. It provides information on:
• How to recognize warning signs of suicide • How to ask about suicidal thoughts and/or intentions • How to respond and • Where to refer
Features include:
• Immediate connection to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline • Specific resources for:
o Military/Veterans o Those who identify as LGBTQ o Spanish speaking individuals o Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing
• Direct access to national and Missouri resource websites

September 6-13 is Suicide Prevention Week

24-hour Suicide hotline: 1-800-273-TALK

SAMSHA & MIMH Gov App: Suicide Lifeguard

Suicide Lifeguard is a FREE app intended for anyone concerned that someone they know may be thinking of suicide. It provides information on:

• How to recognize warning signs of suicide
• How to ask about suicidal thoughts and/or intentions
• How to respond and
• Where to refer

Features include:

• Immediate connection to the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
• Specific resources for:

o Military/Veterans
o Those who identify as LGBTQ
o Spanish speaking individuals
o Persons who are deaf or hard of hearing

• Direct access to national and Missouri resource websites

via FCC Blog

The volume of public feedback in the Open Internet proceeding has been commensurate with the importance of the effort to preserve a free and open Internet.

The Commission is working to ensure that all comments are processed and that we have a full accounting of the number received as soon as possible. Most important, all of these comments will be considered as part of the rulemaking process.  While our system is catching up with the surge of public comments, we are providing a third avenue for submitting feedback on the Open Internet proceeding.

In the Commission’s embrace of Open Data and a commitment to openness and transparency throughout the Open Internet proceedings, the FCC is making available a Comma Separated Values (CSV) file for bulk upload of comments given the exceptional public interest. All comments will be received and recorded through the same process we are applying for the openinternet@fcc.gov emails.

Attached is a link to the CSV file template along with instructions. Once completed, the CSV file can be emailed to openinternet@fcc.gov where if it matches the template the individual comments will be filed for the public record with the Electronic Comment Filing System. When you email this file, please use the subject “CSV”. We encourage CSV files of 9MB or less via email.

The Commission welcomes the record-setting level of public input in this proceeding, and we want to do everything we can to make sure all voices are heard and reflected in the public record.

Dr. David A. Bray, FCC Chief Information Officer. September 11, 2014